Original Research

Training the industrial and organisational psychologist as counsellor: Are we doing enough?

Hanri Barkhuizen, Lené I. Jorgensen, Lizelle Brink
Acta Commercii | Vol 15, No 1 | a253 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ac.v15i1.253 | © 2015 Hanri Barkhuizen, Lené I. Jorgensen, Lizelle Brink | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 22 January 2014 | Published: 02 June 2015

About the author(s)

Hanri Barkhuizen, WorkWell, Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, School of Human Resource Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa
Lené I. Jorgensen, WorkWell, Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, School of Human Resource Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa
Lizelle Brink, WorkWell, Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, School of Human Resource Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: Industrial and organisational (I-O) psychologists are responsible for workplacecounselling. Workplace counselling requires specific skills and training for the I-O psychologist.

Research purpose: The main aim of the study was to explore the role of training the I-Opsychologist as workplace counsellor.

Motivation for the study: Studies show that the I-O psychologist does not feel adequatelyprepared for their role as workplace counsellor. It is important to explore which skills andtraining are needed to equip the I-O psychologist as counsellor.

Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research design with convenience andsnowball sampling was used to identify I-O psychologists (n = 22) from different businesssectors in Gauteng and North-West. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gatherdata and content analysis was utilised to extract themes and sub-themes from the results.

Main findings: The findings showed that the participants know about the process of counselling, but they did not feel adequately prepared for their role as workplace counsellors. From the findings, recommendations for the training of future I-O psychologists are made.

Practical implications: This study adds to the knowledge about ensuring that the I-Opsychologist is equipped during their training for the workplace to address the counselling needs of employees in the workplace in South Africa.

Contribution/value-add: This study contributes towards ensuring that the I-O psychologistis sufficiently prepared for their role as workplace counsellor by making knowledge available regarding the skills required by I-O psychologists to be applied in practice.

Keywords: Industrial-organisational (I-O) psychologist; Counsellor; Skills and competencies; Qualitative research; Training


Keywords

industrial psychologists; counselling

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