Original Research

Entrepreneurship training: Why trainee selection is as vital as training design and delivery

Clint Davies, Menisha Moos, Jurie van Vuuren
Acta Commercii | Vol 23, No 1 | a1134 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ac.v23i1.1134 | © 2023 Clint Davies, Menisha Moos, Jurie van Vuuren | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 20 February 2023 | Published: 13 November 2023

About the author(s)

Clint Davies, Department of Business Management, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Menisha Moos, Department of Business Management, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
Jurie van Vuuren, Department of Business Management, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: Entrepreneurship education (EE) and entrepreneurship training (ET) programmes have boomed but many studies have questioned the degree of applied benefits realised from the training.

Research purpose: The purpose of this research was to resolve the weaknesses and inconsistencies found in prior research concerning ET efficacy.

Motivation for the study: This research aimed to reveal more precisely why and how ET is effective.

Research design, approach and method: The study was quantitative and quasi-experimental, and the data were collected in a non-probability purposive sampling strategy from 234 respondents. The eventual sample size was 184 (before) and 184 (after), in a matched-pair sample, based on the number of usable surveys with a response rate of 78.63%. The study statistics included simple regression and multiple-hierarchical regression analyses.

Main findings: Results indicated entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE) had a greater direct impact on entrepreneurial competencies (r = 0.613) and business management skills (r = 0.552) than training design did (r = 0.471; r = 0.400), respectively. Furthermore, multiple-hierarchical regression showed that ESE mediates the impact of training design on entrepreneurial competencies and business management skills.

Practical/managerial implications: Without high levels of ESE, ET is likely to be ineffective regardless of how well designed or delivered it is, because the trainees’ abilities make all the difference. Trainee selection is therefore a key determinant of ET efficacy.

Contribution/value-add: There is an innovative mediation effect of ESE on the impact that ET has on entrepreneurship human capital (EHC). This extends the implication of seminal work on self-efficacy theory into the realm of ET and EHC outcomes.


Keywords

entrepreneurship training; entrepreneurship human capital; training efficacy; training design; entrepreneurial self-efficacy

JEL Codes

A20: General; E24: Employment • Unemployment • Wages • Intergenerational Income Distribution • Aggregate Human Capital • Aggregate Labor Productivity; I25: Education and Economic Development

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

Metrics

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