Original Research

Organisational ethics context factors in a public energy utility company: A millennial view

Reneilwe M. Matabologa, Aden-Paul Flotman
Acta Commercii | Vol 24, No 1 | a1200 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ac.v24i1.1200 | © 2024 Reneilwe M. Matabologa, Aden-Paul Flotman | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 25 July 2023 | Published: 22 March 2024

About the author(s)

Reneilwe M. Matabologa, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, College of Economic and Management Science, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa
Aden-Paul Flotman, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, College of Economic and Management Science, University of South Africa, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: Millennials have become the largest age cohort in the modern world of work. Understanding the phenomenological experiences of millennials may be the key to facilitating more ethical organisational cultures.

Research purpose: The aim of this article is to explore the lived, working experiences of millennials’ organisational ethics contexts factors as predisposed by ethical leadership in an organisation in the energy sector.

Motivation for the study: An extensive body of research exists concerning the statistical relationship between ethical leadership, ethical culture, and workplace ethics climates. However, less explored is qualitative studies regarding millennials’ work experiences of organisational ethics context factors.

Research design, approach and method: A qualitative research design was selected. Purposive and convenience sampling were utilised. The sample included eight millennials, and face-to-face interviews were used for data collection. Data were analysed by means of content analysis.

Main findings: The findings suggest an ambivalent and paradoxical split in how millennials experience the ethical context factors in the participating organisation.

Practical and managerial implications: The study has implications for the type of leadership styles that should be considered when engaging with millennials. Top human resource management could use the results to create a working environment that actively fosters psychological attachment, satisfaction, and boosts employee commitment.

Contribution or value added: Expanding and enhancing the comprehension of how ethical leadership contributes to the theory of ethical leadership in the work context.


Keywords

co-worker; cohesion; ethical climate, ethical leadership; millennials; organisational culture; organisational justice

JEL Codes

I00: General; I20: General; I30: General

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

Metrics

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